misfitgardens:

#TROPAEOLUM MAJUS

Tropaeolum majus (garden nasturtium, Indian cress or monks cress) is a flowering plant in thefamily Tropaeolaceae, originating in the Andes from Bolivia north to Colombia.

Nasturtiums are considered widely useful companion plants. They repel a great many cucurbit pests, like squash bugs, cucumber beetles, and several caterpillars. They have a similar range of benefits for brassica plants, especially broccoli and cauliflower. They also serve as a trap crop against black fly aphids. They also attract beneficial predatory insects.

All its parts are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient; it has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress, and is also used in stir fry. The flowers contain about 130 mg vitamin C per 100 grams (3.5 oz),[10]about the same amount as is contained in parsley.[11] Moreover, they contain up to 45 mg of lutein per 100 gr,[12] which is the highest amount found in any edible plant. The unripe seed pods can be harvested and dropped into spiced vinegar to produce a condiment and garnish, sometimes used in place of capers.[13]Nasturtiums are also a favorite treat of chickens (along with garlic chives, clover, chickweed and turnips)

Via Wikipedia

I always suggest people growing these self-seeding flowers. I used them in everything; marinades, salads, casseroles, side dishes. I like to wrap meat in them and put them on the grill. I chop up a few leaves and flowers and add it to my tabouli. The kids really like that.

  1. Camera: Nikon D5200
  2. Aperture: f/22
  3. Exposure: 1/80th
  4. Focal Length: 105mm

(Source: wasbella102)

flora-file:

Bulbine frutescens (by flora-file) flora-file:

Bulbine frutescens (by flora-file)

flora-file:

Bulbine frutescens (by flora-file)

QuestionHello! I was wondering if you knew if it's possible to grow pepper plants indoors during the winter? I have seeds for serrano, Anaheim and Jalapeno peppers. I'll probably only plant one of them though, in a small-medium container in my kitchen windowsill. I live in the Central Valley, so it won't get too cold outside, but it certainly won't be "summer warm" in the window. Answer

therandombotanist:

startwithaseed:

I know people who have grown their pepper plants indoors during the winter, but most of them didn’t get fruit on them until spring. I have tried it, but have never been able to avoid the leaves wilting on me by mid-January. 

All of my container gardening books don’t have anything on growing food peppers inside during winter. How annoying! I don’t have any tips on starting that, but hopefully someone can point you in the right direction. 

The challenge is providing enough light in an indoors environment to support the growth of the plant.  Peppers love sunlight, so providing the equivalent of 8+ hours of direct sunlight a day is difficult.  Also, daytime room temperature may be a little low for peppers.  Generally, peppers like it quite warm during the day and slightly cooler at night.    

But, hey, you never know until you try, right?!  Go for it! 

Bright and warm is what convinced me I could grow peppers inside. My old place was bright and kept very warm during the winter. Incidentally, the pepper plant, I left in the ground gave me fruit for 3 years (just died a few months ago).

garden2mabelly:

Green zebra up top, yellow brandywine bottom left and regular old cherry tomatoes — that were supposed to be black cherry but that nursery mislabelled and reminded me why it’s extra important to start your own seeds. 
The rains have come back so it’s harvest everything before the blights take over fall.
Pretty happy with my bloom pinching this year with the Brandywines, this is only half the harvest, the other looked as good or better.  Way fewer gnarly weird fruit with built in wood bug homes :)
garden2mabelly:

Green zebra up top, yellow brandywine bottom left and regular old cherry tomatoes — that were supposed to be black cherry but that nursery mislabelled and reminded me why it’s extra important to start your own seeds. 
The rains have come back so it’s harvest everything before the blights take over fall.
Pretty happy with my bloom pinching this year with the Brandywines, this is only half the harvest, the other looked as good or better.  Way fewer gnarly weird fruit with built in wood bug homes :)
garden2mabelly:

Green zebra up top, yellow brandywine bottom left and regular old cherry tomatoes — that were supposed to be black cherry but that nursery mislabelled and reminded me why it’s extra important to start your own seeds. 
The rains have come back so it’s harvest everything before the blights take over fall.
Pretty happy with my bloom pinching this year with the Brandywines, this is only half the harvest, the other looked as good or better.  Way fewer gnarly weird fruit with built in wood bug homes :)

garden2mabelly:

Green zebra up top, yellow brandywine bottom left and regular old cherry tomatoes — that were supposed to be black cherry but that nursery mislabelled and reminded me why it’s extra important to start your own seeds. 

The rains have come back so it’s harvest everything before the blights take over fall.

Pretty happy with my bloom pinching this year with the Brandywines, this is only half the harvest, the other looked as good or better.  Way fewer gnarly weird fruit with built in wood bug homes :)

waeshael:

startwithaseed:

Can someone ID this gorgeous, probably poisonous and won’t grow in my region plant?

I think this is a white bat flower :D

Wild. It never occurred to me it could be a bat flower because I’ve only seen that from the top. Sometimes, I’m so simple. =)

waeshael:

startwithaseed:

Can someone ID this gorgeous, probably poisonous and won’t grow in my region plant?

I think this is a white bat flower :D

Wild. It never occurred to me it could be a bat flower because I’ve only seen that from the top. Sometimes, I’m so simple. =)

(Source: son-of-horus)

QuestionHello! I was wondering if you knew if it's possible to grow pepper plants indoors during the winter? I have seeds for serrano, Anaheim and Jalapeno peppers. I'll probably only plant one of them though, in a small-medium container in my kitchen windowsill. I live in the Central Valley, so it won't get too cold outside, but it certainly won't be "summer warm" in the window. Answer

I know people who have grown their pepper plants indoors during the winter, but most of them didn’t get fruit on them until spring. I have tried it, but have never been able to avoid the leaves wilting on me by mid-January. 

All of my container gardening books don’t have anything on growing food peppers inside during winter. How annoying! I don’t have any tips on starting that, but hopefully someone can point you in the right direction. 

Can someone ID this gorgeous, probably poisonous and won’t grow in my region plant?

Can someone ID this gorgeous, probably poisonous and won’t grow in my region plant?

(Source: son-of-horus)

It was so hot yesterday, the sun and glass fried my jasmine.